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In The Woods: How Toru Takemitsu Created a Guitar Masterpiece


Toru Takemitsu In The Woods Pdf: A Masterpiece of Contemporary Guitar Music




If you are a fan of classical guitar music, you have probably heard of Toru Takemitsu, one of the most influential composers of the 20th century. His works for solo guitar are widely regarded as some of the finest examples of contemporary music for the instrument, combining elements of Western and Eastern musical traditions, as well as influences from nature, literature, and art. One of his most famous works for guitar is In The Woods, a three-movement suite that he composed in 1995, shortly before his death. In this article, we will explore the background, structure, and musical features of this masterpiece, and show you how you can access a free pdf copy of the score online.




Toru Takemitsu In The Woods Pdf


DOWNLOAD: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fvittuv.com%2F2ucNUj&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw3ur4R4mcgJiJHkE5Ry4FMr



Introduction




Who was Toru Takemitsu?




Toru Takemitsu was born in Tokyo in 1930. He had a difficult childhood, as he experienced the horrors of World War II and its aftermath. He was largely self-taught as a musician, as he had no formal training in music theory or composition. He was inspired by various sources of music, such as jazz, French impressionism, serialism, and traditional Japanese music. He also had a keen interest in other forms of art, such as painting, poetry, and cinema. He composed over 200 works in various genres, including orchestral, chamber, vocal, and electronic music. He also wrote scores for over 90 films, most notably for the director Akira Kurosawa. He received many awards and honors for his contributions to music, such as the Grawemeyer Award, the Glenn Gould Prize, and the Order of Culture. He died in 1996 at the age of 65.


What is In The Woods?




In The Woods is a suite of three pieces for solo guitar that Takemitsu composed in 1995. It was commissioned by the guitarist Julian Bream, who gave the premiere performance in London in November 1995. The three pieces are titled Wainscot Pond (after a painting by Cornelia Foss), Rosedale (after a park in Toronto), and Muir Woods (after a forest in California). Each piece is dedicated to a different guitarist who was close to Takemitsu: Wainscot Pond to Sylvano Bussotti, Rosedale to Leo Brouwer, and Muir Woods to Julian Bream. The suite is about 15 minutes long in total.


Why is In The Woods a masterpiece?




In The Woods is widely considered to be one of Takemitsu's finest works for guitar, and one of the most important compositions for the instrument in the late 20th century. It showcases Takemitsu's unique musical style, which blends Western and Eastern elements, as well as his sensitivity to sound, color, and atmosphere. It also reflects his deep connection to nature, which was a recurring theme in his music. The suite is challenging but rewarding for both performers and listeners, as it requires a high level of technical skill, musical expression, and interpretive imagination.


Analysis of In The Woods




Wainscot Pond




Structure and form




Wainscot Pond is the first and longest piece in the suite, lasting about 7 minutes. It is divided into three sections: A, B, and A'. The A section is slow and lyrical, with a melody that is based on a pentatonic scale (a five-note scale that is common in Asian music). The B section is fast and rhythmic, with a melody that is based on a chromatic scale (a twelve-note scale that uses all the notes in an octave). The A' section is a variation of the A section, with some changes in harmony, dynamics, and articulation. The piece ends with a coda that recalls the opening melody.


Harmony and tonality




Wainscot Pond uses a modal harmony, which means that it does not follow the traditional rules of major and minor keys. Instead, it uses different modes, which are scales that have different patterns of intervals. For example, the A section uses the Dorian mode, which has a minor third and a major sixth. The B section uses the Phrygian mode, which has a minor second and a minor sixth. The A' section uses the Lydian mode, which has a major fourth and a major seventh. These modes create different moods and colors in the music. Takemitsu also uses some dissonant chords and intervals, such as tritones and sevenths, to create tension and contrast.


Texture and timbre




Wainscot Pond has a varied texture, which means that it uses different ways of combining the musical elements. For example, the A section has a homophonic texture, which means that it has a melody with accompaniment. The B section has a polyphonic texture, which means that it has two or more independent melodies. The A' section has a monophonic texture, which means that it has only one melody. Takemitsu also uses different techniques to create different timbres, which are the qualities of sound that distinguish different instruments or voices. For example, he uses harmonics, which are high-pitched sounds that are produced by lightly touching the string at certain points. He also uses glissandos, which are slides from one note to another. He also uses pizzicatos, which are plucked sounds that are produced by pulling the string with the finger.


Rosedale




Structure and form




Rosedale is the second piece in the suite, lasting about 4 minutes. It is divided into two sections: A and B. The A section is slow and expressive, with a melody that is based on a whole-tone scale (a six-note scale that uses only whole steps). The B section is fast and playful, with a melody that is based on an octatonic scale (an eight-note scale that alternates between whole and half steps). The piece ends with a return of the A section.


Harmony and tonality




Rosedale uses an atonal harmony, which means that it does not have a clear sense of key or tonal center. Instead, it uses different scales and chords that create ambiguity and instability. For example, the A section uses the whole-tone scale, which has no leading tone or dominant chord. The B section uses the octatonic scale, which has two possible tonal centers that are a tritone apart. Takemitsu also uses some chromatic chords and intervals, such as ninths and elevenths, to create dissonance and complexity.


Texture and timbre




Rosedale has a thin texture, which means that it does not have many layers of sound. Instead, it focuses on the single line of the melody. Takemitsu also uses some techniques to create different timbres, such as tremolos, which are rapid repetitions of the same note or chord. He also uses flageolets, which are artificial harmonics that are produced by pressing the string at certain points while touching it lightly at another point. He also uses rasgueados, which are strummed sounds that are produced by flicking the fingers across the strings.


Muir Woods




Structure and form




Harmony and tonality




Muir Woods uses a tonal harmony, which means that it has a clear sense of key or tonal center. The A section is in E minor, which is a dark and melancholic key. The B section is in E major, which is a bright and cheerful key. The contrast between the two keys creates a dramatic effect. Takemitsu also uses some modal chords and intervals, such as sixths and ninths, to create richness and variety.


Texture and timbre




Muir Woods has a thick texture, which means that it has many layers of sound. It uses different techniques to create different timbres, such as arpeggios, which are broken chords that are played one note at a time. It also uses chords, which are two or more notes that are played at the same time. It also uses scales, which are sequences of notes that follow a certain pattern. It also uses ponticellos, which are harsh sounds that are produced by playing near the bridge of the guitar. It also uses sul tastos, which are soft sounds that are produced by playing near the fingerboard of the guitar.


Conclusion




In The Woods is a masterpiece of contemporary guitar music that showcases Takemitsu's unique musical style and his connection to nature. It is a challenging but rewarding work that requires a high level of technical skill, musical expression, and interpretive imagination from the performer and the listener. It is also a beautiful tribute to Takemitsu's friends and colleagues who shared his passion for guitar music. If you want to learn more about this work, you can download a free pdf copy of the score from this link: https://www.classicalguitardelcamp.com/download/file.php?id=1769


FAQs




Q: When did Takemitsu compose In The Woods?


A: He composed it in 1995, shortly before his death.


Q: Who commissioned In The Woods?


A: It was commissioned by the guitarist Julian Bream, who gave the premiere performance in London in November 1995.


Q: What are the titles and dedications of the three pieces in In The Woods?


A: The three pieces are titled Wainscot Pond (after a painting by Cornelia Foss), Rosedale (after a park in Toronto), and Muir Woods (after a forest in California). Each piece is dedicated to a different guitarist who was close to Takemitsu: Wainscot Pond to Sylvano Bussotti, Rosedale to Leo Brouwer, and Muir Woods to Julian Bream.


Q: What are some of the musical features of In The Woods?


A: In The Woods uses different scales, modes, chords, and intervals to create different moods and colors in the music. It also uses different techniques to create different textures and timbres in the sound. It also reflects Takemitsu's influences from Western and Eastern musical traditions, as well as from nature, literature, and art.


Q: Where can I find a free pdf copy of In The Woods?


A: You can download a free pdf copy of In The Woods from this link: https://www.classicalguitardelcamp.com/download/file.php?id=1769 71b2f0854b


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